Pandora’s Morphological Marvels

The new China guide is out on shelves this week! I’ve written before about how much of the research Lonely Planet authors do never makes it into the book. Here’s one of the parts, a box for one section of the Wǔlíngyuán National Park in northern Hunan, that got cut. First, a little background: It all started…

The Damming of the Xingu

Chief Raoni weeps after hearing that the Belo Monte dam, the world’s third largest, will be built. (Photo courtesy of the Support Chief Raoni Facepook page) After decades of debate, the Brazilian government has chosen development and electric power over the Xingu River’s eco-system and the culture and history of the Kayapo people. (If you watch…

Works for the People

“I cut my hair…it’s a sign of mourning. I’m mourning for my people because they are dying…we have no choice for our source of food, we have no control over our land…it is held in trust by the Federal government…it gets complicated, very complicated, colonialism does and genocide.” –Oyate Wacinyapi (Russell Means), Oglala Sioux activist…

Most journalists aren’t scientists. So what?

In early September, the media jumped at a chance to grab page views by characterizing a Stanford Annals of Internal Medicine study as showing organic food offers no real health benefits over conventionally grown foods. Their headlines ignored the subtleties. The New York Times wrote, “Stanford Scientists Cast Doubt on Advantages of Organic Meat and…